UM Named Member of NSF-funded Consortium for Advancing Research Computing Practices

By Special to UM News

UM Named Member of NSF-funded Consortium for Advancing Research Computing Practices

By Special to UM News
The National Science Foundation has awarded a consortium of 28 universities, which includes the University of Miami, a $750,000 grant to fund a Research Coordination Network.

The National Science Foundation has awarded a consortium of 28 universities, which includes the University of Miami, a $750,000 grant to fund a Research Coordination Network to set up a national forum for the exchange and dissemination of best practices, expertise, and technologies to enable the advancement of campus-based research computing activities.

The project, entitled “RCN: Advancing Research and Education Through a National Network of Campus Research Computing Infrastructures - The CaRC Consortium,” is designed to bring together a wide range of campuses and community stakeholders to form a novel, yet complementary, element of an evolving and expanding national cyberinfrastructure ecosystem. 

The project’s initial collaborating institutions include UM and Clemson University, and partners include Harvard University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, University of Utah, University of Southern California, University of Hawaii, University of Oklahoma, University of California-Berkeley, Oklahoma State University, Ohio Supercomputer Center, University of Missouri, Yale University, Florida Atlantic University, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, University of Florida, University of Georgia, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, Brandeis University, Kansas State University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Stanford University, Arizona State University, Montana State University, University of Minnesota, University of Virginia, University of Colorado-Boulder, and University of Notre Dame.

Nicholas Tsinoremas, founding Director of UM’s Center for Computational Science (CCS), will serve as a lead principal investigator and as the CaRC’s inaugural vice chair.

“CaRC represents an exciting opportunity to create a vibrant community that emphasizes the strategic nature of research computing through facilitating the sharing of resources and expertise,” Tsinoremas said. 

CaRC will offer a program of activities at a national scale, including the sharing of knowledge, best practices, software and hardware technologies, expertise, workforce development, and professional development.  The project officially began on July 1. 

Click here to read the full press release sent out by Clemson University.