u

Challenging The Status Quo of Representation

Original article featured on www.koozarch.com on May 2, 2017.
By UM News

Original article featured on www.koozarch.com on May 2, 2017.

Challenging The Status Quo of Representation

By UM News
KooZA/rch interviews Jaime E. Correa, Associate Professor in Practice at the School of Architecture.

Interview

Who influences you graphically?

Since the late 1980’s, photo-realistic means of digital representation have hijacked the search for the metaphysical and the rational in the architecture of the city. This photo-realistic world robbed architectural and urban projects of their power to be interpreted and completed through a free range of associations in the minds of their readers. My representation heroes are those that challenge our normal way of looking at architecture by emphasizing the objectivity and simultaneity of views of the same object, the extraordinary and yet mysterious capacity of humans to perceive space and place, and the metaphysical qualities embedded in an environment in constant flux. As a consequence, the illustration paradigms that I followed do not come from a contemporary group of pragmatic/realistic illustrators but from within a unique group of architects, artists, writers, and philosophers who, at some point in their careers, challenged the status-quo of representation by introducing a desire for a rational order or a metaphysical emphasis on interpretation and imagination. My heroes are people who went through deep professional disappointments and public rejection because of their infatuation with allegorical meanings and non-objectual ideas. Amongst this group are: Giotto and his proto-re­naissance perspectival work at Assisi, the metaphysical paintings of Giorgio de Chirico and Carlo Carra, the oversized illustrations of Edward Hopper, the cubist paintings of Le Corbusier and Amedee Ozenfant, the Futurists Letterscape projects in the period between the two world-wars, the interpretative graphics of Gio Ponti, the cartoons of Chris Warren and Richard McGuire, the open-ended illustrations in SimCity video games, Japanese-style Manga, the art work of Lina Bo Bardi, the illustrations of the school of Milan, the work of Superstudio and Archizoom, the rational drawings of Aldo Rossi, Massimo Scolari, and Franco Purini, the early work of Madelon Vriesendorp and John Hejduk, the drawings of the School of Miami, the black-on-white drawings of San Rocco magazine, the political writings of Nietzsche, Bakunin, Gramsci, and Baudril­lard, and the literary exaggerations and mythological inventions in the work of Pataphysical essayists, Oulipo com­pendiums, Situationist manifestos, and Magic Realistic novels.

Read more.