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Spring 2023 Commencement Marks Significant Milestone for Our Graduates

By Maritza Cosano

Spring 2023 Commencement Marks Significant Milestone for Our Graduates

By Maritza Cosano
Frost School of Music participated in the Spring 2023 Commencement from May 11 to May 13, where over 4,100 University of Miami graduates were celebrated.

The University of Miami commencements have a rich history, bringing together students, faculty, staff, and guests to celebrate a significant milestone. The recent ceremony enjoyed perfect weather with clear blue skies, creating an inspiring backdrop for the event. 

The Watsco Center was the proud host, where students and their families shared the joy of the occasion. Alumni also gathered to reconnect and reminisce about their time at the university, proud to be part of the Miami Hurricanes community. The green, orange, and white flag flew high, symbolizing the unity and strength of the university. 

The University of Miami's Grand Marshal, Laura Bianchi of the Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, led the commencement ceremony procession. She was followed by the School of Architecture, School of Education and Human Development, Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric, and Earth Science, the Phillip and Patricia Frost School of Music, School of Communication, School of Nursing and Health Studies. The deans and some distinguished faculty members were on stage, including Frost's Dean Shelton G. Berg.

Chris Alfonso, a Bachelor of Music candidate, performed the National Anthem. Afterward, President Julio Frenk delivered a welcoming speech and symbolically presented the graduates with their degrees. 

"We come today to celebrate your success. Life is punctuated by rites of passage that transition from one stage of life to the next. Commencements are meant to mark your transition from a student discovering your vocation to a graduate out in the world adding to your life story and your contribution to humanity," said Frenk.  

"Reaching this major milestone requires a network of support. Today would not be possible without your network's faith in you and your goals." Frenk then asked the graduates to rise and thank their professors, families, mentors, and friends. And a roar of applause rocked the center. 

Last week, 225 Frost School of Music graduates received their degrees at this year's Spring Commencement ceremony. Among them were 33 doctoral, 81 masters, and 111 bachelor's degree holders. The graduating class included 8 Frost Online Live Entertainment Management and 14 Music Industry master's graduates.

"Under the recommendation of the faculty of the Frost School of Music, I'm pleased to present these candidates—the artists and intellectuals who enhance our lives to the transformative power of music," said Steven Moore, associate dean, Undergraduate Studies and professor of Practice of Music Education and Music Therapy, as he presented the candidates for the Frost School of Music.

[Top, L to R] Jordan Martin, Diamonique Vidro, Victoria Hernandez, and Yu Yi Chuang. [Bottom, L to R]  Jaela Smith, 
Taneshia Nash Laird, and Avi Kohan.

 

After graduation, the graduates' families gathered in the parking lot to celebrate. Victoria Hernandez, a Modern Artist Development and Entrepreneurship major, posed with her grandmother, dressed in green to support the U. Hernandez plans to use her music skills to immerse herself in the music business. She said, "I'm a singer/songwriter with a minor in Music Industry. I hope to combine my skills as an independent artist with my degree to work at a record label." 

During the conversation, other nearby graduates chimed in. Yu Yi Chuang, who graduated with a BA in Professional Music and Music Therapy, shared her plans to take a six-month break to work before pursuing her master's degree in Music Therapy. 

"I'm pursuing my master's degree in Music Education at the University of Florida and then hopefully teach high school band after that," added Avi Kohan, who earned a BA in Music Education. 

"It will be hard to leave the U; I'll have to begin slowly to detach from campus life," another graduate said as he hurriedly passed by.