U-SoA Faculty Supports Bahamian Economy through Preservation

U-SoA Faculty Supports Bahamian Economy through Preservation

School of Architecture faculty are working on a project to restore the 1780s governor's residence on Harbor Island, which was unscathed by Hurricane Dorian but has fallen into disrepair over the centuries. 
By Maya Bell

School of Architecture faculty are working on a project to restore the 1780s governor's residence on Harbor Island, which was unscathed by Hurricane Dorian but has fallen into disrepair over the centuries. 

U-SoA Faculty Supports Bahamian Economy through Preservation

By Maya Bell
Professors Victoria and Lopez Drive Resiliency and Recovery

Since Hurricane Dorian left the Bahamas’ northern-most islands in ruins, the University of Miami’s Teófilo Victoria has visited the sprawling archipelago several times, and he plans to return as often as he can.

“I feel it’s an obligation,” the associate professor of architecture said. “A sure way of helping.”

Not because he and School of Architecture lecturer Ricardo Lopez have been working with the University of the Bahamas to restore the decaying residence of one of the Bahamas’ early British governors, the last royal governor of Virginia. Nor because Victoria’s private firm, de la Guardia Victoria Urbanists and Architects, has several projects underway on the island chain.

Victoria is committed to helping the Bahamas, which derives more than half of its GDP from tourism, recover. He understands others may have qualms about vacationing on or visiting the island chain when so many of its residents are suffering the dire consequence of the category 5 storm that relentlessly pounded the Abacos and Grand Bahama islands for two days, killing at least 50 people and leaving tens of thousands homeless. Read more.