University of Miami School of Architecture first-year students construct a mega-model of a resilient Bahamian village, part of a school-wide initiative of projects focused on the country.

Students sculpt possible solutions to real-world problems

First year architecture students examine their model for a resilient Bahamian community at the Thomas P. Murphy Design Studio Building. Photo: Michael R. Malone/University of Miami
By UM News

First year architecture students examine their model for a resilient Bahamian community at the Thomas P. Murphy Design Studio Building. Photo: Michael R. Malone/University of Miami

Students sculpt possible solutions to real-world problems

By UM News
University of Miami School of Architecture first-year students construct a mega-model of a resilient Bahamian village, part of a school-wide initiative of projects focused on the country.

The Bahamian village began taking shape just as the last class before spring break began. Groups of students carried in the huge cardboard cutouts and set them on the Thomas P. Murphy Design Studio Building floor to form the foundation and establish the subdivisions for the future town. Then, the 100 first-year architecture students—moving like a pandemonium of parrots—slid their construction models of houses, schools, churches, and retail shops into designated lots.

The model for a resilient Bahamian community constitutes the largest-ever constructed by students at the University of Miami School of Architecture and forms part of an ambitious school-wide initiative focused on the Bahamas, which is still reeling from the devastation caused by Hurricane Dorian last year. Read more.