Professor A. Michael Froomkin Publishes Article About Privacy Gaps with Two Recent Grads

Professor A. Michael Froomkin Publishes Article About Privacy Gaps with Two Recent Grads

Professor A. Michael Froomkin
By Miami Law Staff Report

Professor A. Michael Froomkin

Professor A. Michael Froomkin Publishes Article About Privacy Gaps with Two Recent Grads

By Miami Law Staff Report
The article, “Safety as Privacy,” discusses new technologies, such as internet-connected home devices, which create privacy gaps that can cause danger to people.

Professor A. Michael Froomkin, the Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Distinguished Professor of Law, recently published an article in the Arizona Law Review titled “Safety as Privacy.”  The article was co-authored with recent Miami Law graduates, Phillip Arencibia and P. Zak Colangelo-Trenner. 

The article emphasizes the deep connection between privacy and safety to lay a foundation for arguing that U.S. administrative agencies with a safety mission can, and should, make privacy protection one of their goals. The article also takes a detailed look at the safety missions of several agencies, arguing that the agencies have the discretion, if not necessarily the duty, to demand enhanced privacy practices from those within its jurisdiction.

Professor Froomkin is the founder and editor-in-chief of JOTWELL: The Journal of Things We Like (Lots), an online law journal that publishes reviews of the best new scholarship relating to the law.  He is also the founder of the We Robot conference on legal and policy issues relating to robotics. 

He is an Affiliated Fellow of the Yale Information Society Project (Yale ISP), and on the Advisory Boards of the Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC), the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), and the Future of Privacy Forum.  In 2020, he was awarded the University of Miami Distinguished Faculty Scholar Award.