Let the Listening Process Continue
President Julio Frenk is conducting a listening exercise during his first 100 days on campus.
By UM News

President Julio Frenk is conducting a listening exercise during his first 100 days on campus.
Let the Listening Process Continue
By UM News
President Julio Frenk is continuing his ambitious listening exercise, visiting schools, colleges, and other constituencies.

As promised during the recent Town Hall, University of Miami President Julio Frenk is continuing his ambitious listening exercise initiative, visiting schools and colleges, talking with faculty, staff, and students, and meeting with other constituencies for their valuable insights, comments, and thoughtful recommendations about the University and its future.

The photo gallery below will be updated periodically with photographs from different stops along the listening exercise.

On Friday, September 25, Frenk was at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, where he met with faculty following a brief tour of the Virginia Key-based campus. A number of other visits are planned over the next several months, and the UM community is encouraged to attend those meetings and share their thoughts on a special website created to let people weigh in with some of their ideas and concerns. The site is http://miami.edu/listen

Frenk’s two-hour stay at the marine school came two weeks after he hosted a Town Hall at the BankUnited Center on September 10, the first public event of his presidency. It was there that he unveiled the ambitious listening exercise in which faculty, staff, students, and others will share with him their aspirations and hopes for the U.

During the Town Hall, Frenk also detailed his four major aspirations for the University: the pursuit of excellence in multiple areas including academics, service, the arts, athletics, and administration; achieving relevance in helping to solve the world’s most pressing problems; becoming a model for values such as diversity and tolerance; and becoming what he called “a force of integration across the Americas,” or specifically taking advantage of UM’s geographic location in greater Miami as a gateway to the world.