Why you should move it (move it)

By Life@TheU

Why you should move it (move it)

By Life@TheU
We spoke with Mitch Nienhuis, assistant director of fitness and personal training at UM’s Herbert Wellness Center, about how to best combat the hazardous effects of prolonged sitting, which include pain and higher risk of developing chronic diseases.

What’s at stake?
According to Nienhuis, lower back pain, headaches, even hip or knee pain can be linked to a lack of mobility. “Excessive sitting results in shortened muscles, which pull excessively on the skeleton when standing,” he explained. A sedentary lifestyle, which is linked to excessive sitting and inactivity, has a negative effect on muscular strength, cardiovascular health and endurance, and overall quality of life. “People who are sedentary are at a significantly higher risk of various chronic diseases like diabetes, heart disease, and atherosclerosis,” he added.

How to combat
Activating and stretching your muscles can provide a myriad of benefits. To be effective, it doesn’t have to be complicated or require tons of space or equipment. Start by getting up every hour and walking around for at least three minutes. Better yet, set your smartphone timer or countdown app to alert you every 60 minutes to get up so you never miss a step.

Ready to take it up a notch? Try performing these five simple moves twice a day. Before starting any exercise, consult your physician and ensure you’re healthy enough to perform these activities.






 

More options
Time to enhance your fitness routine and healthy lifestyle? Through the Herbert Wellness Center's SHAPE UP program, faculty and staff can earn 20 percent off the cost of membership. With options to join group classes, small group training, or work one-on-one with a personal trainer, you can grab a friend or jump in on your own. Learn more about available classes and programs offered at the U .

Do you have a favorite activity or fitness routine? Shoot an email to lifeattheu@miami.edu and tell us what you do to stay healthy and active.