Inside The New York Times newsroom

Chelsea Matiash standing by the iconic red staircase at The New York Times, where each year journalists gather to hear the names of Pulitzer Prize winners.

By Jacqueline R. Menendez

Chelsea Matiash standing by the iconic red staircase at The New York Times, where each year journalists gather to hear the names of Pulitzer Prize winners.

Inside The New York Times newsroom

By Jacqueline R. Menendez
UM alumna Chelsea Matiash, senior editor of digital storytelling at the NYT, credits her UM experience for preparing her for her career.

It’s Wednesday morning, the day before Christine Blasey Ford is expected to testify in the Brett Kavanaugh confirmation hearings in Washington, D.C. 

On the second floor of The New York Times offices in Manhattan, editors have gathered for the Page One meeting. The Supreme Court nominee’s hearing dominates the discussion. Comments are spoken softly as if somehow adding to the significance of the event about to unfold, and the role they each play in reporting it.

Page One NYT meeting
Page One Meeting at The New York Times

Seated among them is Chelsea Matiash, a University of Miami alumna and senior editor of digital storytelling for the Times. She has been in this role for eight months and is also a member of the Digital Transition Team, which is comprised of journalists working to optimize how the newsroom operates in the digital realm.

“We want to make sure that the training we provide works with the coverage intentions of the desk,” said Matiash. “We don’t want to be giant agents of change; we would rather be ambassadors of the new tools.”

Working with award-winning journalists and editors, Matiash said she relies on their knowledge and expertise in covering the news. Her role, and that of her team, is to facilitate a better digital experience.

Matiash has wasted no time since embarking on her professional journey and she credits her UM education, including serving as editor in chief on The Miami Hurricane newspaper her senior year, as adequately preparing her for a career in news.

“They taught me independence and how to take ownership of a news product,” she said.

Matiash keeps in touch with some of her UM professors who are still a great source of support for her. 

“I will never forget having class with Jim Virga,” said Matiash. “He was such an important teacher who helped me reframe my thinking and helped me focus on what my goals were and what I needed to get out of my education.”

Matiash has some simple advice for UM students who want to pursue a career in news: Do not be afraid to try.

“Not to be cheesy, but you can’t get an opportunity that you don’t go for.”